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COVID-19 Resource Center

COVID-19 Census Data

Southeastern Med is committed to transparency during these difficult times. Periodically we will be updating our inpatient data and COVID for your easy reference.

 

Public Service Announcements on COVID-19 Vaccination

Visitation Hours (Effective September 7, 2021)

We will continue to update our visitation policies, keeping the safety of our patients and associates as a priority as we respond to new COVID-19 developments.  Thank you for your patience and understanding.

 

Vaccine distribution FAQ

IS SOUTHEASTERN MED OFFERING VACCINES OR BOOSTERS?

Southeastern Med is not currently offering vaccinations or boosters. Currently, the Pfizer is the only vaccine with an approved, recommended booster. If you received the Pfizer vaccine, we encourage you to visit your local health department or call a pharmacy near you. For a list of retailers and providers offering the COVID-19 vaccine, visit the Ohio Department of Health website.

WHICH VACCINES HAVE BEEN APPROVED BY THE FDA?

The COVID-19 vaccine manufactured by Pfizer-BioNTech was fully approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on August 23, 2021.

Moderna submitted their application for full FDA approval on August 26, 2021 and is awaiting final approval. Johnson & Johnson has stated their intention to pursue full FDA approval.

All three COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective and continue to undergo rigorous evaluation.

ARE SOME COVID-19 VACCINES BETTER THAN OTHERS?

All FDA-authorized COVID-19 vaccines will be safe and offer a significant level of immunity to people who receive them, so the best COVID-19 vaccine to receive is the one available to you.

All FDA-authorized COVID-19 vaccine trials demonstrated 100% effectiveness in preventing hospitalization or death in clinical trials, and significant effectiveness in preventing severe COVID-19. There is no advantage to choosing between the different types of vaccines produced by different manufacturers, and delaying vaccination is not recommended if vaccine access is available to you.

IS A COMBINED FLU AND COVID-19 VACCINE AVAILABLE?

There is currently no combined flu and COVID-19 vaccine. However, it is safe to receive both of them at the same time.

Getting vaccinated FAQ

WHY SHOULD I GET THE COVID-19 VACCINE?

If you are fully vaccinated, you have a significantly lower risk of getting infected with COVID-19 compared to an unvaccinated person. Clinical trial data and real-world data demonstrate the vast majority of vaccinated people who acquire COVID-19 have minimal to no symptoms and are not hospitalized.

In the clinical trials that lead to FDA review, the Pfizer and Moderna vaccine study revealed that vaccination had ~95% efficacy in preventing symptomatic COVID-19. No vaccine prevents 100% of all infections.

HOW DOES THE VACCINE WORK?

The vaccine offers immunity by activating antibodies to fight the virus in your immune system so that if you’re exposed, your body can fight the virus before you get sick. Although the vaccine is not expected to provide full immunity, it is the most effective way to avoid contracting COVID-19 or minimizing symptoms if you do contract COVID-19.

IF I’VE ALREADY HAD COVID-19, DO I STILL NEED TO BE VACCINATED?

It is not known how long natural immunity from COVID-19 infection lasts. Because of the severe health risks of COVID-19, you may be advised to get a vaccine even if you’ve recovered from COVID-19.

WILL I EXPERIENCE SIDE EFFECTS FROM THE COVID-19 VACCINE?

Minor side effects are an indication that your body is responding to the vaccine and building protection against COVID-19. The side effects may feel like cold or flu symptoms and may even affect your ability to do daily activities, but should go away in a few days.

HOW WILL THINGS CHANGE IF I GET THE VACCINE?

Even if you have been vaccinated, you may still be able to get sick with COVID-19 and potentially spread it to others who have higher risks of complications. You should continue to wear a mask, practice social distancing and follow other preventive measures for COVID-19.

ARE THERE ANY REASONS SOMEONE SHOULD NOT GET THE COVID-19 VACCINE?

People under 12 should not receive COVID-19 vaccines because they are still being studied to determine the proper application for children.

People with serious allergic reactions, such as anaphylaxis, should discuss the COVID-19 vaccine with their doctor before receiving it.

Patients who have received monoclonal antibody infusions for COVID-19 should wait 90 days before receiving a COVID-19 vaccine.

People who have a short-term illness, such as strep throat or a cold, should wait to get the vaccine until they’re feeling better.

HOW DO I KNOW THE COVID-19 VACCINE IS SAFE?

The U.S. vaccine safety system ensures that all vaccines are as safe as possible. Clinical trials are used to study the effectiveness of vaccines in thousands of study participants. Data from these trials is provided to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to determine vaccine safety and effectiveness. If the FDA determines a vaccine candidate meets its rigorous safety and effectiveness requirements, it can make the vaccine available for use through approval or emergency use authorization. After the FDA makes its determination, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) reviews available data before making final vaccine recommendations to the CDC. The COVID-19 vaccine development process involved several steps comparable with those used to develop other vaccines, and there have been no shortcuts in the vaccine development process.

After Vaccination FAQ

I RECEIVED THE VACCINE A WHILE AGO. WILL I NEED A BOOSTER?

The Centers for Disease Control announced September 24 that boosters of the Pfizer vaccine are now available to eligible individuals who received their second Pfizer vaccine dose at least six months ago:

Certain immunocompromised patients who are more than 28 days past their second dose of the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine are also eligible to receive a booster. Locations administering the Moderna vaccine can be found at vaccines.gov.

CAN I STOP WEARING A MASK AND SOCIAL DISTANCING AFTER I GET VACCINATED?

All COVID-19 vaccines that have been FDA approved or authorized for emergency use prevent hospitalization and death. Getting vaccinated is the best thing you can do to protect yourself from COVID-19. It will take time to achieve community immunity. It’s unknown what percentage of the population needs to be vaccinated to limit the spread of the virus through community immunity.

You can help protect others waiting for their turn to be vaccinated by continuing to cover your mouth and nose with a mask, washing your hands often, and staying at least 6 feet away from others. The vaccines do not provide 100% immunity to COVID-19, so there is a small chance you may still be able to get infected and spread the virus to others.

CAN THE COVID-19 VACCINE AFFECT BREAST SCREENING EXAMS?

Swollen lymph nodes under the arm are a known side effect of COVID-19 vaccination that can be misidentified as breast cancer during screening exams. Consider scheduling screening mammograms, ultrasounds and MRIs before your first dose of the vaccine or six weeks after your final dose. This is only recommended when possible, and if it will not delay necessary care. Don’t postpone a breast exam if a new breast lump or symptoms appear, such as nipple discharge, skin changes or palpable adenopathy (abnormally large lymph nodes). Breast screening is one of the best ways to detect cancer early. Talk with your doctor if you are unsure whether you should delay breast screening due to COVID-19 vaccination.

CAN VACCINATED PEOPLE WITH BREAKTHROUGH INFECTIONS SPREAD THE DELTA VARIANT?

Emerging science suggests that some vaccinated people can be infected with the Delta variant and spread it to others. However, compared to unvaccinated people, fully vaccinated persons have a lower risk of infection. In addition, the risk of becoming ill, being hospitalized, or dying from COVID-19 is much lower.

As of July 26, 2021, the CDC reported 6,587 breakthrough infections resulting in hospitalizations or death, out of 163 million people vaccinated — 0.004%.

In areas with substantial or high spread, CDC recommends that everyone wear a mask in public indoor settings to prevent further spread.

 

 

 

 

HOW IS THE VACCINE EFFECTIVE IF YOU CAN STILL GET COVID-19?

If you are fully vaccinated, you have a significantly lower risk of getting infected with COVID-19 compared to an unvaccinated person. Clinical trial data and real-world data demonstrate the vast majority of vaccinated people who acquire COVID-19 have minimal to no symptoms and are not hospitalized.

In the clinical trials that lead to FDA review, the Pfizer and Moderna vaccine study revealed that vaccination had ~95% efficacy in preventing symptomatic COVID-19. No vaccine prevents 100% of all infections.

IF YOU HAVE THE VACCINE AND ARE ASYMPTOMATIC FOR COVID-19, CAN YOU SPREAD COVID-19 TO OTHERS?

We are still learning about viral transmission in fully vaccinated people. Emerging science suggests that vaccinated people infected with the delta variant can likely spread it to others. The CDC recently stated the delta variant accounts for over 80% of all circulating strains of COVID-19 in the United States.

A person is less likely to become infected by the delta variant if they are fully vaccinated. More importantly, a fully vaccinated infected person is less likely to become hospitalized or die. Compared to a vaccinated person, an unvaccinated person infected with the delta variant is significantly more contagious.

Due to the delta variant, the CDC now recommends wearing a mask in areas with substantial or high community transmission for all people, regardless of vaccination status. In areas with lower rates of community transmission, a vaccinated person may choose to wear a mask as an extra layer of protection if they have close or regular contact with an unvaccinated person or child or immunocompromised person.